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Have you ever wondered how your genome works? Well, thanks to scientists like Roger Kornberg, awarded the 2006 Nobel prize for Chemistry, who has painstakingly studied the micromechanics of transcription, we're getting a much clearer picture of what happens inside the nucleus, and how the billions [...] Scanning electron microscope shows up beads ...
Section: Content | Category: In brief | Date: Monday, 02 October 2006 | Hits: 19202
Imagine that you are on a journey, visiting the nucleus of a cell of the human body. We can think of the nucleus as the "inner city". In terms of activity, the inner city resembles an ant colony on caffeine—it's incredibly busy How does the cell know what parts of the information to access in order to produce what it needs? November 2012 Written ...
Section: Content | Category: Features | Date: Wednesday, 14 November 2012 | Hits: 34462
... to be addressed with newly funded FET FLAGSHIPS by 2018. The supporters of this initiative propose to the European Commission to launch a large-scale initiative aiming to decipher the structure-function relationships of the cell nucleus as a complex biological system at all levels, from molecules to entire genomic and epigenomic landscapes, as they ...
Section: Content | Category: News | Date: Tuesday, 03 May 2016 | Hits: 2338
One of the world's smallest organisms may hold clues about how the cell nucleus evolved. Nanoarchaeum equitans is a species of tiny microbe, discovered in 2002 in a hydrothermal vent off the coast of Iceland. It grows in temperatures close to boiling ontop of another single-celled creature called [...] Hydrothermal vents are home to microbes ...
Section: Content | Category: In brief | Date: Monday, 01 December 2008 | Hits: 12956
... couple along DNA backbone (pink), which in turn coils intimately around histone proteins (blue and white) to form chromosomes (red) in the nucleus.Artwork by Nicolas Bouvier Brona McVittie reports :: June 2006 Over 50 years have passed since Watson and Crick first published the three-dimensional structure of the DNA double helix. With Darwinian ...
Section: Content | Category: In brief | Date: Thursday, 01 June 2006 | Hits: 18650
... might be identical genetically but not epigenetically. Such differences are discernable at the molecular level in the way that their chromosomes are arranged within the nucleus of each cell. Twisted around tiny protein balls, the same DNA can have different consequences for a cell. Both balls and string assume complex 3D structures depending on their ...
Section: Content | Category: In brief | Date: Thursday, 01 June 2006 | Hits: 16518
... produce the same pattern. In the case of Carbon Copy, she was created from an egg cell that had its nucleus replaced with one from Rainbow. Although the cell from which Carbon Copy was cloned had one inactive X, the developmental programme reactivates both X-chromosomes, and the process of inactivation recurs in a random manner. This results in an entirely ...
Section: Content | Category: In brief | Date: Thursday, 01 June 2006 | Hits: 23796
... You can access certain information from the hard disk using the programmes on the computer. But there are certain password protected areas and those which are open. I would say we're trying to understand why there are passwords for certain regions and why other regions are open."Jörn Walter (Saarland, Germany) "There is around 2m of DNA in a nucleus ...
Section: Content | Category: In brief | Date: Thursday, 01 June 2006 | Hits: 19608
... a cell nucleus. For example some of our genes are imprinted - only expressed from the copy inherited from dad or mum. Another example concerns the shutting down of one of the two X chromosomes in females – a process known as X-chromosome inactivation, whereby an entire chromosome is stably silenced while its genetically identical homolog remains active. Epigenetic ...
Section: Content | Category: Features | Date: Tuesday, 05 March 2013 | Hits: 15327
... of being the only career volunteer – although many women scientistsof her generation also volunteered or were underpaid – to win a Nobel Prize, which she received for her nuclear shell model of the atomic nucleus. The generation game Maria Goeppert was born in 1906 in Kattowitz (or Katowice in Polish) which was then part of German Prussia but today ...
Section: Content | Category: Women in science | Date: Thursday, 02 May 2013 | Hits: 7943
... in the Netherlands and Denmark, she ended up in Stockholm, a relative scientific backwater at the time. “I have none of my scientific equipment. For me, this is harder than anything else,” she wrote to her lifelong partner in science, Hahn. The nucleus of a great idea Lise Meitner’s scientific career truly took off when she entered Vienna University ...
Section: Content | Category: Women in science | Date: Monday, 01 April 2013 | Hits: 9705
... watching how parents passed on their features to baby peas. He laid down the rules of inheritance, which are the basis of genetics today. His name was Gregor Mendel (1822-1884) August Weissmann (1834-1914) and others recognised that genetic information was stored in the nucleus of a cell. In his view cells start with the same information then ...
Section: Content | Category: In brief | Date: Thursday, 01 June 2006 | Hits: 58428
Response written by: Elphège Nora, PhD - postdoctoral researcher in Edith Heard's laboratory, Institut Curie Video on DNA ReplicationVideo on DNA replication process However don't forget that the nucleus is a crowded place and DNA polymerases are not just floating around. The constantly bump into many, many other molecules, which can actually affect ...
Section: Content | Category: FAQ common | Date: Friday, 09 November 2012 | Hits: 4830
... sac – also have the potential to reprogram mature cells. However, the reprogrammed cells they produce differ from those programmed by normal ES cells, reflecting the different provenance of the cells used. The researchers were investigating the development of mouse embryos to see how chromatin – the package of DNA and protein in a cell's nucleus – ...
Section: Content | Category: In brief | Date: Monday, 01 March 2010 | Hits: 11797
In eukaryotic cells, the DNA is packaged within the nucleus in a structure called chromatin. This structure is a highly dynamic nucleoprotein complex that plays a central role in regulating how and when DNA is copied and transcribed into RNA. Thus chromatin states vary from cell type to cell type and along chromosomes. The epigenome refers to these ...
Section: Content | Category: FAQ common | Date: Friday, 16 September 2011 | Hits: 18579