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Response written by: Elphège Nora, PhD - postdoctoral researcher in Edith Heard's laboratory, Institut Curie Germ cells of human beings (and all other organism actually) are unfortunately unable to "copy" the skills and knowledge of their producer. Children/offspring, develop from the fusion of two gametes (germ cells), one from the mother and one ...
Section: Content | Category: FAQ common | Date: Friday, 09 November 2012 | Hits: 4029
The human body contains more than one hundred thousand billion cells, which can be divided in two categories, if we look at it in a simplified way. One of them is somatic (derived from the greek "soma", meaning body) cells, which are the kind of cells forming the body of an organism, such as skin, blood, or muscle cells - apart from germ cells, the ...
Section: Content | Category: FAQ common | Date: Monday, 23 March 2015 | Hits: 13301
Minkel, JR. Aug 9, 2010. How Acquired Diseases Become Hereditary Illnesses.Scientific American [online]
Section: Content | Category: General epigenetics | Date: Tuesday, 12 June 2012 | Hits: 4164
Our genome, our DNA, has taken a central place in our daily life, whether we think about our health, our well-being and longevity, our susceptibility to disease, our aptitude for learning, and our adaptation and responses to diet, drugs and the environment. Yet despite having successfully sequenced the full human genome, it is not enough to make sense ...
Section: Content | Category: News | Date: Tuesday, 03 May 2016 | Hits: 2338
Imagine that you are on a journey, visiting the nucleus of a cell of the human body. We can think of the nucleus as the "inner city". In terms of activity, the inner city resembles an ant colony on caffeine—it's incredibly busy How does the cell know what parts of the information to access in order to produce what it needs? November 2012 Written ...
Section: Content | Category: Features | Date: Wednesday, 14 November 2012 | Hits: 34462
Sarah Palin might be rather shocked to learn that she has thousands of genes in common with the fruit fly (watch video). Yet for this very reason flies are key to understanding human diseases like cancer. For more than half a century scientists have been using Drosophila melanogaster as a tool to [...] Research on the eyes of fruit flies reveals ...
Section: Content | Category: In brief | Date: Monday, 02 February 2009 | Hits: 12387
Epigenetics, explained (from the BBC)Best video explanation we've seen of epigenetics and its implications for human health, outlined in simple, understandable terms. Epigenetics, explained (from the BBC) Best video explanation we've seen of epigenetics and its implications for human health, outlined in simple, understandable terms. ...
Section: Content | Category: General epigenetics | Date: Wednesday, 22 August 2012 | Hits: 11777
... philosophers of her own time,” was the verdict of her contemporary, the Christian historiographer Socrates Scholasticus. Scientific achievements Either alone or in collaboration with her father, Hypatia left humanity with a profound scientific legacy. She is credited by some sources with inventing the plane astrolabe, which is an ancient navigating ...
Section: Content | Category: Women in science | Date: Tuesday, 20 November 2012 | Hits: 11032
... Luigi Menabrea’s memoir on the machine.In fact, her notes were longer than the memoir. In them, she explained the difference between the Difference Engine, which required a human operator to set the initial values that had been computed and set into columns, and the Analytical Engine which used “operation cards” to perform mathematical operations on ...
Section: Content | Category: Women in science | Date: Friday, 04 January 2013 | Hits: 10278
Response written by: Elphège Nora, PhD - postdoctoral researcher in Edith Heard's laboratory, Institut Curie Each cell of the body produces molecules known as proteins. The structure of proteins is directly encoded by the cells' genes. In humans, genes are very similar from one individual to another but there are not completely identical. This means ...
Section: Content | Category: FAQ common | Date: Friday, 09 November 2012 | Hits: 4524
... she noticed that “caterpillars produced beautiful butterflies or moths”. This sparked in her a fascination bordering on obsession: “I withdrew from human society and engaged exclusively in these investigations.” Flower power While in Nuremberg, Maria took the unusual step of setting up shop for herself, rather than becoming a partner in her husband’s ...
Section: Content | Category: Women in science | Date: Monday, 03 December 2012 | Hits: 21190
This article explains what systems biology approaches can bring to human health--and your fantasy football selections. [online] ...
Section: Content | Category: General epigenetics | Date: Tuesday, 12 June 2012 | Hits: 3983
... immunoprecipitation (ChIP; used to map histone modifications) and bisulphite mapping (used to map sites of DNA methylation) coupled with high resolution tiling arrays and the rapidly improving deep sequencing technologies are being harnessed to define the human epigenome in various tissues and developmental stages, and the environmental factors that ...
Section: Content | Category: Features | Date: Tuesday, 05 March 2013 | Hits: 15327
“Ten years ago publication of the human genome sequence gave the world a blueprint for a human being. But just as a list of automobile parts does not tell us how a car engine works, the complete genome sequence—a list of the DNA "letters" in all the chromosomes of the human cell—did not reveal how the genome directs our cells' day-to-day activities ...
Section: Content | Category: General epigenetics | Date: Tuesday, 12 June 2012 | Hits: 5351
... how replication initiates or proceeds. This is an area of very intense research. Also not just humans need to replicate DNA; by definition, all living organisms do it—even the simplest bacteria! Nowadays we understand enough about this process that we can recreate part of it in test tubes in the lab, to make many copies of DNA from a few molecules. ...
Section: Content | Category: FAQ common | Date: Friday, 09 November 2012 | Hits: 4830