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Mechanisms of epigenetic inheritance.A. Coghlan, June 27, 2011. New Scientist [online]
Section: Content | Category: General epigenetics | Date: Tuesday, 12 June 2012 | Hits: 3986
... nucleus of the cel'.1838 M. J. Schleiden´s incorrect epigenetic theory claimed that a cell-nucleus is created de novo from the fluid of the cell. This served as a classical antithesis to Edouard van Beneden´s 1883 discovery that chromosomes are individual entities. In 1842 Karl Wilhelm von Nägeli discovered subcellular structures that would later became ...
Section: Content | Category: FAQ common | Date: Friday, 16 September 2011 | Hits: 23474
... couple along DNA backbone (pink), which in turn coils intimately around histone proteins (blue and white) to form chromosomes (red) in the nucleus.Artwork by Nicolas Bouvier Brona McVittie reports :: June 2006 Over 50 years have passed since Watson and Crick first published the three-dimensional structure of the DNA double helix. With Darwinian ...
Section: Content | Category: In brief | Date: Thursday, 01 June 2006 | Hits: 18620
... might be identical genetically but not epigenetically. Such differences are discernable at the molecular level in the way that their chromosomes are arranged within the nucleus of each cell. Twisted around tiny protein balls, the same DNA can have different consequences for a cell. Both balls and string assume complex 3D structures depending on their ...
Section: Content | Category: In brief | Date: Thursday, 01 June 2006 | Hits: 16482
... the kitty didn't turn out to be a 'carbon copy' despite having identical DNA to her genetic 'mother' Rainbow. This can be partly explained by an epigenetic phenomenon known as X-inactivation. Calico cats are always female, which means they have two X chromosomes in every cell. The gene for orange coat colour is located on the X chromosome, but there ...
Section: Content | Category: In brief | Date: Thursday, 01 June 2006 | Hits: 23766
“Ten years ago publication of the human genome sequence gave the world a blueprint for a human being. But just as a list of automobile parts does not tell us how a car engine works, the complete genome sequence—a list of the DNA "letters" in all the chromosomes of the human cell—did not reveal how the genome directs our cells' day-to-day activities ...
Section: Content | Category: General epigenetics | Date: Tuesday, 12 June 2012 | Hits: 5350
... a cell nucleus. For example some of our genes are imprinted - only expressed from the copy inherited from dad or mum. Another example concerns the shutting down of one of the two X chromosomes in females – a process known as X-chromosome inactivation, whereby an entire chromosome is stably silenced while its genetically identical homolog remains active. Epigenetic ...
Section: Content | Category: Features | Date: Tuesday, 05 March 2013 | Hits: 15269
... respond and adapt to environmental changes, as well as changes during development, cell reprogramming and ageing. If you believe studying the dynamic nucleus is paramount to understand how the genome functions, support this initiative! 4DNucleome - initiative in Europe Nuclei of mitotic chromosomesCredit: David Sitbon, Ph.D. student in the Almouzni ...
Section: Content | Category: News | Date: Tuesday, 03 May 2016 | Hits: 2290
... cervical cancer in 1951. During her illness, a researcher collected (without her consent) some of these cells and managed to grow them outside of the body in a petri dish. Indeed, compared to somatic cells, these cancerous cells have more DNA (over 30 additional chromosomes) which have been rearranged and mutated, allowing them to acquire new abilities ...
Section: Content | Category: FAQ common | Date: Monday, 23 March 2015 | Hits: 13262
... she crossed the Atlantic to train at Columbia University in New York, where she focused on sex chromosomes in sea snakes. Mixing work with pleasure Her love of nature and fascination with animal life was such that she even devoted her leisure time to their study. Holidaying at biological stations along the Norwegian coast, she claimed that she loved ...
Section: Content | Category: Women in science | Date: Thursday, 28 March 2013 | Hits: 6106
... the spatial element of epigenetic memory, the way our chromosomes are arranged inside the tiny nuclear domain. Her research team use fluorescence techniques to probe and track nuclear components as they assemble in yeast cells. I quiz her about the implications of this research. "It's not so important that my grandmother understands epigenetics. But ...
Section: Content | Category: Features | Date: Friday, 01 August 2008 | Hits: 38613
... best known examples of epigenetics is mammalian X-chromosome inactivation (11). Males and females differ in their sex chromosome constitution with males having an X and a Y and females having two X chromosomes. In females, one of the two X chromosomes get shut down, or silenced, during early development to ensure that gene expression levels from the ...
Section: Content | Category: Features | Date: Wednesday, 14 November 2012 | Hits: 34317
... University Medical School) has shown that SirT1 is involved in locking DNA away in a compact form of chromatin called heterochromatin. It was also a component detected in deregulated epigenetic machinery gone awry during prostate cancer progression. SirT2 comes into play when chromosomes need to condense before cell division. So how does all ...
Section: Content | Category: Features | Date: Monday, 01 January 2007 | Hits: 25350
Chromatin is the molecular substance of a chromosome. It consists of a complex of DNA, RNA and protein in eukaryotic cells. Frequently, people encounter pictures of chromosomes which have a striped pattern of stronger and lighter staining. What are these chromosome bands? Do they represent genes? No, they do not necessarily represent genes nor do they ...
Section: Content | Category: FAQ common | Date: Friday, 16 September 2011 | Hits: 57326
... when a cell established a particular pattern of 'active' and 'non-active' genes this same pattern will be passed on to a daughter cell even though during cell division all genes are 'shut off' and chromosomes have become tightly wrapped up or condensed. This process allows development of different structures and organs during development. The nucleotides ...
Section: Content | Category: FAQ common | Date: Tuesday, 13 September 2011 | Hits: 6209