YOU ARE HERE PUBLICSCIENTIST WEBSITE

Latest asked questions

Search

Search
  Advanced Search
Results
Total: 27 results found.
  Order by   
 Display
A chromosome is a large macromolecule which contains part of the genetic information stored in the genome. The core of the chromosome-molecule is a double stranded DNA string which is interacting non-covalently with a large number of proteins (chromatin proteins) and shorter chains of ribonucleic acid (RNA). The DNA of a chromosome within a human cell ...
Section: Content | Category: FAQ common | Date: Tuesday, 13 September 2011 | Hits: 3643
Mechanisms of epigenetic inheritance.A. Coghlan, June 27, 2011. New Scientist [online]
Section: Content | Category: General epigenetics | Date: Tuesday, 12 June 2012 | Hits: 3992
The discovery of the chromosome was descriptive from the beginning and inseparably interwoven with the discoveries of the cell and the nucleus. All findings became possible only after Leeuwenhoek´s invention of the microscope in 1674. In 1831 Robert Brown described the 'areola' in orchids being constantly detectable in all cells. He called this areola'the ...
Section: Content | Category: FAQ common | Date: Friday, 16 September 2011 | Hits: 23500
... silently on the nuclear territory of chromosome 10 until treatment with an inducing compound switches on its expression. When activated, the majority of uPA genes relocate outside of their chromosome territory. The observation that gene movement outside chromosome territories is associated with expression has led some researchers to propose that genes ...
Section: Content | Category: In brief | Date: Monday, 01 March 2010 | Hits: 11720
... silencing has a role beyond virus resistance: it protects the genome by silencing transposons (mobile DNA elements that can hop around the genome). This maintains the integrity of chromosome structure and function and keeps gene expression right during growth, development and in response to external stimuli. David is also keen to explore epigenetic ...
Section: Content | Category: In brief | Date: Monday, 01 September 2008 | Hits: 13136
... might be identical genetically but not epigenetically. Such differences are discernable at the molecular level in the way that their chromosomes are arranged within the nucleus of each cell. Twisted around tiny protein balls, the same DNA can have different consequences for a cell. Both balls and string assume complex 3D structures depending on their ...
Section: Content | Category: In brief | Date: Thursday, 01 June 2006 | Hits: 16519
“Ten years ago publication of the human genome sequence gave the world a blueprint for a human being. But just as a list of automobile parts does not tell us how a car engine works, the complete genome sequence—a list of the DNA "letters" in all the chromosomes of the human cell—did not reveal how the genome directs our cells' day-to-day activities ...
Section: Content | Category: General epigenetics | Date: Tuesday, 12 June 2012 | Hits: 5351
... couple along DNA backbone (pink), which in turn coils intimately around histone proteins (blue and white) to form chromosomes (red) in the nucleus.Artwork by Nicolas Bouvier Brona McVittie reports :: June 2006 Over 50 years have passed since Watson and Crick first published the three-dimensional structure of the DNA double helix. With Darwinian ...
Section: Content | Category: In brief | Date: Thursday, 01 June 2006 | Hits: 18651
... et de la cancérologie. Voir un extrait - Voir le contenu / acheter Chromosome walk Au fil du génome humain, découvrez des histoires fascinantes à l'origine de la vie! Chromosome walk ...
Section: Content | Category: Nos lectures | Date: Friday, 16 November 2012 | Hits: 2278
... cervical cancer in 1951. During her illness, a researcher collected (without her consent) some of these cells and managed to grow them outside of the body in a petri dish. Indeed, compared to somatic cells, these cancerous cells have more DNA (over 30 additional chromosomes) which have been rearranged and mutated, allowing them to acquire new abilities ...
Section: Content | Category: FAQ common | Date: Monday, 23 March 2015 | Hits: 13301
... respond and adapt to environmental changes, as well as changes during development, cell reprogramming and ageing. If you believe studying the dynamic nucleus is paramount to understand how the genome functions, support this initiative! 4DNucleome - initiative in Europe Nuclei of mitotic chromosomesCredit: David Sitbon, Ph.D. student in the Almouzni ...
Section: Content | Category: News | Date: Tuesday, 03 May 2016 | Hits: 2338
... she crossed the Atlantic to train at Columbia University in New York, where she focused on sex chromosomes in sea snakes. Mixing work with pleasure Her love of nature and fascination with animal life was such that she even devoted her leisure time to their study. Holidaying at biological stations along the Norwegian coast, she claimed that she loved ...
Section: Content | Category: Women in science | Date: Thursday, 28 March 2013 | Hits: 6113
... a cell nucleus. For example some of our genes are imprinted - only expressed from the copy inherited from dad or mum. Another example concerns the shutting down of one of the two X chromosomes in females – a process known as X-chromosome inactivation, whereby an entire chromosome is stably silenced while its genetically identical homolog remains active. Epigenetic ...
Section: Content | Category: Features | Date: Tuesday, 05 March 2013 | Hits: 15327
... the kitty didn't turn out to be a 'carbon copy' despite having identical DNA to her genetic 'mother' Rainbow. This can be partly explained by an epigenetic phenomenon known as X-inactivation. Calico cats are always female, which means they have two X chromosomes in every cell. The gene for orange coat colour is located on the X chromosome, but there ...
Section: Content | Category: In brief | Date: Thursday, 01 June 2006 | Hits: 23797
... have stippled. But in this case, the deep red seeds never appeared again in the offspring, even though the gene was still physically there—this was a violation of the genetic laws of Mendelian inheritance and researchers were very puzzled. In another example, in 1938, Muller showed that in flies carrying chromosome rearrangements that changed the position ...
Section: Content | Category: Features | Date: Wednesday, 14 November 2012 | Hits: 34462